The Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) is an investment in the American consumer. ACP benefits are investments in consumers and their families, and ultimately, in our economy. The benefit provides low-income families with access to necessary technology—internet service—which allows the persons in those households, including children, the tools to rise out of poverty and become financially independent.

The structure of the ACP puts broadband choice in the hands of consumers and enables them to find jobs, do homework, see a doctor, pay bills, check bus schedules, connect with friends and family, remain active with their faith community, and participate in the digital economy. Democrats and Republicans agree: it is critical that the ACP is extended.

  • Federal Officials and Groups
    • Members of the New York Delegation: “We cannot risk losing a tool that helps close the opportunity divide for students, provides telehealth for vulnerable homebound individuals, and employment connectivity for jobseekers.”
    • New Democrat Coalition: “The program has had great success as millions of families who previously could not get online or struggled to pay for broadband access are now connected to the internet. By helping to secure broadband access, the ACP has allowed millions of Americans to maximize educational opportunities, increase telehealth opportunities, stimulate economic growth, and connect with loved ones.”
    • Representative Doris Matsui (D-CA): “If this vital program were even to briefly lapse, it would undue years of progress closing the digital divide. I share your goal of sustaining this bipartisan program and urge you to include funding to keep ACP solvent well-into 2024.”
    • Senators Jacky Rosen (D-NV), Gary Peters (D-MI), and 32 other members of the Senate: “Should ACP funding not be extended, millions of Americans could be at risk of losing access to broadband. We would take significant steps backward in the progress we’ve already made to connect more Americans to the internet through additional federal broadband investments. In just the last 6 months, we’ve invested billions of dollars to build out critical infrastructure, making sure the most rural areas of our country have access to broadband services. The ACP ensures families can now afford those services. We cannot let them face a connectivity cliff by letting this program run out of money with no future assistance.”

  • State Officials and Groups
    • Michigan State Senate: “The ACP is a critical program for Michigan citizens and, along with other sources of state funding, is a vital means to build and improve broadband infrastructure, provide internet devices to those who lack them, and promote the adoption of modern technology among our least-connected citizens.”
    • Congressman Kweisi Mfume (D-MD), Cody L. Dorsey : “More than 20 million Americans rely on the subsidy, including 800,000 veterans, 1 million college students, more than 3 million families with school-age children receiving free or reduced lunch and 5 million older adults.”
    • New Mexico State Representatives Debra M. Sarinana and Tara L. Lujan: “The end of the federal affordable connectivity program would impede the success of ongoing federal and state efforts to close the digital divide by halting construction of new infrastructure that otherwise would have helped to reach those in unserved and underserved communities.”
    • Mayors’ Partnership for Progress: “As Appalachian mayors, we have seen first-hand how the ACP has empowered our constituents who grew up on the wrong side of the digital divide. In fact, in communities throughout Ohio, rural and urban alike, over one million households – nearly 55 percent of those eligible – currently rely on the program.”
    • North Country Broadband Alliance: “North Country Broadband Alliance urges local Town and County governments to support this resolution to demonstrate to Congress that North Country governments show solidarity for the need to assist our most vulnerable constituents in affording essential broadband access.”
    • African American Mayors Association: More American families are enrolled in ACP than SNAP benefits. There are nearly 23 million low-income households already benefiting from the ACP to pay for internet service. Millions of people – including people of color, veterans, students, seniors, people with disabilities – are using this subsidy right now to improve the socioeconomic outcomes for them and their families.
    • Pasadena Chamber of Commerce & Civic Association: “The ACP provides important funding to help bring internet and broadband access to those areas that are currently underserved or neglected.”
    • The League of Arizona Cities and Towns Executive Committee: “The Executive Committee of the League of Arizona Cities and Towns, does hereby express its support for the continuation of the ACP and urge the federal government to provide funding sufficient to meet the need of qualifying Americans, and ensure that low-income Arizona households can continue to receive the support they need to participate in the digital arena.”
    • Lieutenant Governor Garlin Gilchrist, II, Senate Democratic Whip Jay Chaudhuri, Commissioner Dana Barrett (Broadband Task Force): “ACP is a vital initiative that prevented millions of Americans from falling behind economically during the pandemic, and it is essential to the progress of other federal broadband investments and the ongoing pursuit of digital equity.”
    • Pittsburgh Mayor Ed Gainey: “In its early yet deeply impactful existence, the ACP has proven to be the most important tool at our disposal to close the digital divide. In Pittsburgh alone, nearly 22,000 households are enrolled; across the nation, the number of enrolled households is over 20 million.”
    • New York State Senators Lea Webb, Jeremy Cooney, John Mannion, Rachel May, Sean Ryan, and Michelle Hinchey: “Experts are warning that the Affordable Connectivity Program could run out of funds as early as next spring, cutting off this critical program for millions of New Yorkers in rural Upstate, and tribal areas and beyond our borders.”
    • Governor Gretchen Whitmer (D-MI): “Analysts estimate that ACP will run out of funding by as early as April 2024. Absent a bipartisan collaboration between Congress and the White House to find a commonsense funding solution for the ACP, nearly 20 million households enrolled nationally would be in jeopardy of losing connectivity as well as all the essential services that come with it. All of society stands to gain from this program. In addition to the low-income Americans who gain affordable internet access, widespread access to broadband drives economic growth, workforce development, and public safety.”
    • Governor Katie Hobbs (D-AZ): “As the state is preparing to deploy almost $1 billion dollars from the federal Broadband Equity, Access, and Deployment (BEAD) program, [the ACP] is essential to protect affordable internet prices once broadband infrastructure is deployed across the state.”
    • Texas Legislative Rural Caucus: “ACP is important for rural Texas and for communities of the state that struggle financially. Currently, of the 4.3 million eligible Texas households to participate in ACP, just over 1.4 million do, and 36% of households in Texas with incomes less than $20,000 lack connectivity. A primary barrier preventing Texans online is affordability. The ACP enables households that would otherwise be unable to afford an internet subscription to do so by providing a significant monthly discount, in turn allowing our country as a whole to chip away at the digital divide.”
    • National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators: “THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators recognized the improvements brought by the Affordable Connectivity Program and renews its call for a permanent technology-neutral broadband subsidy for low-income Americans funded through appropriations, by making ACP permanent, and ensuring improved coverage through applying small-area cost of living adjustments to the qualifying poverty guidelines.”
    • U.S. Conference of Mayors: “Highspeed internet is a necessity for almost every American, connecting people to educational opportunities, telemedicine, and of course, opportunities for work and entrepreneurship. Living in the 21st century means having quality high-speed internet, and the Affordable Connectivity Program helps ensure this for millions of American families.”
    • National Governors Association: “Congress should continue to prioritize the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) that helps low-income households access affordable internet service. Continued funding for the ACP is crucial in our efforts to ensure the adoption of services now available through the significant broadband infrastructure investments in our states and territories.”
    • WA Delegation: “The ACP is an essential component of Washington’s economic growth, workforce development, and innovation. Allowing the ACP to end would be a great disservice to Washingtonians who rely on the program to access vital online services and resources.”
    • County of Los Angeles Supervisor Janice Hahn: “The County supports fully funding the ACP for its ability to further develop and expand broadband infrastructure and reliable, affordable networks to bridge the digital divide, provide connectivity and services, increase access to high-speed internet to benefit as many households as possible, and ensure digital inclusion, particularly in underserved communities.”
    • Governors Spencer Cox (R-UT), Jared Polis (D-CO), and 24 other bipartisan Governors: “Closing our nation’s digital divide transcends politics. Whether you live in a rural area, a suburb, or a city, every American needs access to high-speed internet. Preserving the ACP will allow us to build upon the progress we’ve made in expanding connectivity rather than falling behind in a mission we cannot afford to lose.”
    • Governor Roy Cooper (D-NC): “The ACP is a critical complement to our collective efforts to expand access to broadband infrastructure in rural, unserved communities. With $42.5 billion in Broadband, Equity, Access and Deployment (BEAD) funding going to the states, we want to maximize this once-in-a-generation opportunity. The ACP plays a valuable role in helping households afford broadband and encouraging internet providers to build out rural broadband infrastructure.”
    • Philadelphia Mayor James Kenney: “By bolstering the ACP, we can expand its reach and impact, enabling more families to bridge the digital divide and fully participate in our increasingly interconnected world.”

  • David A. Deptula, Lieutenant General, U.S. Air Force (Ret), James “Spider” Marks, Major General, U.S. Army (Ret), Mastin Robeson, Major General, U.S. Marine Corps (Ret), and James J. Carey, Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy (Ret.): “Health care, employment, job training, and VA benefits are just a few of the many services that veterans can access without leaving their homes by using the internet. More than 2.2 million veterans, for example, depend on internet-supported telemedicine solutions for their physical and mental well-being.”
  • United Way: “Currently, over 22 million American households are enrolled in this effective, life changing program – nearly 17% of the total — massively expanding access to online education, work, health care, government services, and entertainment and culture. It’s one of the most important, effective public policies in place today driving towards equal opportunity and a level playing field for all.”
  • Jenna Leventoff, ACLU: “The internet is no longer optional – it’s essential. Without broadband, our local communities cannot access opportunities in education, and employment, nor speak out online and exercise their First Amendment rights. Households who struggle to afford broadband shouldn’t have to sacrifice other necessities to stay connected. The Affordable Connectivity Program has proved to be so necessary that it is facing a funding cliff.”
  • Christine E. Hamp, National Grange: “Extending funding for the ACP is a no-brainer. It also has broad public support across the political spectrum. Polling from the Digital Progress Institute shows that 64% of Republicans support renewing the program along with 70% of Independents and 95% of Democrats.”
  • Mike McNerney, Resilience (USAF Veteran): “For more than 750,000 veterans across the United States, this connectivity is all made possible thanks to the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) – and unless Congress funds this essential program, those veterans will be cut off by Spring.”
  • National Action Network: “By helping to secure broadband access, the ACP has allowed millions of Americans to maximize educational opportunities, increase telehealth opportunities, stimulate economic growth, and connect with loved ones.”
  • National Hispanic Media Coalition, Hispanic Federation, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, NAACP, National Action Network, National Urban League, UnidosUS: “Today, eligible households from all districts reap the benefits of affordable, high-speed internet through ACP – connecting Americans to the digital economy, expanding telehealth services, and supporting students in remote learning opportunities.”
  • AARP: “Unfortunately, if the funding for ACP is allowed to run out, millions of older Americans will once again lose access to affordable internet service. Without ACP, despite spending billions of dollars on broadband infrastructure, there will be fewer customers on the other end who can afford the service.”
  • Colonel Tom Magness (ret.): “The ACP has directly benefited veterans in need – bringing them connectivity that allows essential resources to come directly to them wherever they are.”
  • African American Mayors Association: “The consequences would be dire if ACP is not re-funded in the coming months. The more than 19 million American households that rely on the program would be at risk of losing not only their connection, but also the critical resources that broadband enables. Access to affordable, reliable broadband is essential and seemingly touches every facet of life. Those without access to high-speed internet will be at a severe disadvantage.”
  • Consortium for Constituents with Disabilities: “By investing in the FCC’s Affordable Connectivity Program, we can address the existing digital disparities faced by people with disabilities and promote a more inclusive and equitable society.”
  • Leadership Conference on Human Rights: “Lack of high-speed internet access among low-income people, communities of color, and other underserved communities is of particular concern, and the ACP has proven critical in getting households in these communities online.”
  • Nation’s Finest: “The ACP, a bipartisan initiative, has been instrumental in bridging the digital divide, providing internet services and devices to our veterans and their families. For our veterans, the accessibility of affordable internet has been more than a convenience; it has been a lifeline. Internet connectivity is not just about staying in touch with loved ones or accessing online entertainment. It means an opportunity for our veterans to access critical services, to pursue online education or remote job opportunities, and to maintain the social and professional connections so vital to their reintegration into civilian life.”
  • Wisconsin Veterans Chamber of Commerce: “ACP funding is rapidly running out and if there is not additional funding added, the implications would be severe and far-reaching. Not only would nearly 20 million Americans face the risk of losing their digital lifeline, but Wisconsin’s veterans and their families would also be disproportionately affected. The impact on rural communities, where the ACP has had a significant effect and where many veterans reside, would be particularly devastating.”
  • Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council: “There is no doubt that affordable connectivity is a sound tax-dollar investment that adds to the nation’s growth and productivity, while giving more people career and work options – such as starting a small business.”
  • ALLvanza: “The ACP’s success in connecting more families to broadband is boosting productivity and building wider, more capable workforces. One recent study found that subsidized broadband’s success in expanding the labor force delivers an exceptional return on investment: $2,200 in economic benefits for each participating household. As economists point to labor shortages as one factor driving inflation, extending the ACP to help more low-income families access online job boards, training programs or remote work opportunities should be a no-brainer.”
  • National Grange: “For rural America, broadband deployment has been toughest in hard-to-reach areas, which in turn causes high costs for internet on rural consumers. The ACP, however, has finally fulfilled the promise Washington has made for a decade to rural Americans, by alleviating the high cost through providing a discount.” 
  • LGBT Tech: “The ACP is working well, and the $14 billion Congress initially allocated for the program is running out. Experts estimate ACP funds could run out by the middle of 2024 – leaving millions of households, including many LGBTQ+ Americans, with the choice of paying out-of-pocket to continue their service or losing home internet access all together. Congress can’t let that happen.”
  • Hispanic Leadership Fund: “The impact on education cannot be overstated. Millions of students who have been afforded the opportunity to prioritize their education with ACP would be left behind.  One bedrock policy principle that should not be controversial is that every child in the United States should have access to a quality education.  In our modern world, a good education requires internet access.”
  • Mid-Maine Chamber of Commerce: “Politics aside, an end to the Affordable Connectivity Program would set us back years in our effort to overcome the affordability gap, a barrier that accounts for two-thirds of our nation’s digital divide. By not having an effective solution in place to assist Americans struggling to afford an internet subscription due to level of income, we will more or less be fighting this fight with one arm tied behind our back.”
  • Latin Builders Association: “With all its success, the Affordable Connectivity Program is at peril of running out of funding by early to mid-2024. In order for the millions of Americans who have gain economic independence and improved their quality of life through reliable access to the internet, it is imperative that members of Congress act responsibility and sensibly to provide the necessary funding necessary for so many to remain connected. The additional funding should serve as an investment which will almost certainly offer exponential returns in the future and continue to foster American exceptionalism for generations to come.”
  • Drew Garner, Benton Institute for Broadband & Society: “The ACP was created so that financial hardship would never be a barrier to internet access. If you lost your job one day, the ACP meant you could still look for work the next. No distance could keep you from your doctor, your teacher, or your loved ones. The ACP was a guarantee that opportunity would be available to people across the U.S no matter what.”
  • John B. Horrigan, Benton Institute for Broadband & Society: “Overall, ACP enrollment is growing in the places and among the people that the program targets, and not only that, but it is also helping people who did not previously have access to get online. In other words, the answer to the question of whether the ACP is closing the digital divide is a clear yes.”
  • Adrianne B. Furniss, Benton Institute for Broadband & Society: “The ACP became a long-term commitment that the FCC would help connect veterans and others and keep them connected to telehealth services, educational opportunities, and workforce development programs.  But the ACP is running out of funding, meaning over 800,000 veterans could soon lose internet service or face higher monthly bills. President Joe Biden has proposed to fully fund ACP through 2024, but Congress has not yet acted. We can’t let this happen.”
  • John B. Horrigan, Benton Institute for Broadband & Society: “The overall implication of this analysis is one of “gain and sustain”: ACP has helped sustain the increase in broadband adoption that happened during the pandemic and that seems to be the greater part of the program’s overall impact. ACP has also, even if to a more modest degree, aided in gains in overall broadband adoption since the program was launched in 2022.”
  • Steve Pociask and Nate Scherer, American Consumer Institute: “All Americans deserve to be able to participate in the digital marketplace, and the ACP has a role to play in ensuring that this occurs. Therefore, lawmakers should move quickly to extend this important program before funding runs out. An enormous amount of time and energy has already been spent attempting to close the digital divide. Congress must not stop now.”
  • Former FCC Commissioner Mike O’Rielly: “ACP represents our best available means to promote and sustain internet adoption for consumers in need, which should overcome my fellow conservatives’ traditional concerns. Congressional action to extend this program in 2023 should be a priority.”
  • Steve Pociask, American Consumer Institute: “There are few government programs that have proven to be as effective as the Affordable Connectivity Program, which provides affordable internet to more than 21 million consumers nationwide. With Program funds running out, we applaud the White House for its new $6 billion funding request supporting the ACP to ensure lower-income Americans remain online.”
  • Blair Levin, Brookings Institution: “The end of the program would be a disaster for families who generally have little savings or discretionary income and will suddenly face monthly broadband charges of $30 or more. It would also rob the broader economy of an opportunity to grow faster due to universal connectivity.”
  • Steve Forbes, Chairman, Forbes Media: “It’s often said there are three parties on Capitol Hill – Republicans, Democrats and appropriators. In a rare moment of bipartisan agreement, the first two have recognized the positive impact of the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP). Now it’s time for the appropriators to get on board and find a solution to permanently fund the program.”
  • Jonathan Cannon, R Street Institute: “The ACP was created during the COVID-19 pandemic, but it has evolved since then to be one of the most efficient programs addressing the adoption gap in the digital divide.”
  • Jeffrey Westling, American Action Forum: “If Congress wants to continue to subsidize broadband connectivity, ACP may be its best model for a single subsidy program in the future. To the extent that legislators have concerns with the size of the benefit, the eligibility criteria, fraud and waste, or some other aspect of the program, these issues can be reviewed and reformed. But by allowing the program to expire, regulators will likely be forced to rely on outdated programs such as Lifeline to fill affordability gaps, and the improvements of ACP over these outdated subsidy models will be lost.”
  • Joel Thayer, Digital Progress Institute: “Although ACP’s fate is uncertain, these bipartisan efforts and acknowledgments of the importance the program plays in closing the digital divide are encouraging developments indeed. What’s more, the bipartisan support for ACP further demonstrates that closing the digital divide is not a partisan issue, but a unifying objective that all Americans can get behind.” 
  • Roslyn Layton, Strand Consult: “However beneficial, ACP funds will run out before the end of the year, threatening to pull the rug out from under millions of U.S. households who rely on ACP to afford broadband.  Congress recognizes the importance of the program and the upward mobility that internet connectivity enables. Programs like ACP can pay for themselves over time with targeted reforms to modernize broadband subsidy progra0ms.”
  • Tom Schatz, Citizens Against Government Waste: “One program that appears to be working as intended is the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP), which replaced the Emergency Connectivity Program established in ARPA.  This program allows qualified low-income households to obtain a voucher of up to $30 monthly ($75 monthly for households on Tribal lands) to gain access to the internet using any available vendor or technology.  As of August 21, 2023, there were 20,351,962 enrolled households in the ACP program.” 
  • Charles B. “Chuck” Meyer, CIPP/E: “Conservatives can and should rally behind the ACP and its design to help lift hard working families up across Texas. The ACP helps break down barriers to accessing 21st century tools Americans need to find better jobs, allow their children to learn and do homework, and perform the daily online tasks that most of us take for granted.”